Herbal Malaysia - Natural Herbal Supplier And Herbalist

BF1 supply major natural herbal in Malaysia. All natural herbal are selected with best qualities and safe for internal intake or external use.

We supplier major natural herbal in form of : fresh herbal plants, dry herbal, herbal powder, herbal extract, herbal oil and herbal essential oil. Do not hesitate to contact us for any consultation or read our website for more information.

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There are too many herbals and spices, if you look for herbals or spices which not listed here yet, please fill in this Herbal Order Form and click on submit or contact us.

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chinese-herbsChinese Herbs

Chinese Herbology is the theory of Traditional Chinese herbal therapy, which accounts for the majority of treatments in Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).

The term herbology is misleading in so far as plant elements are by far the most commonly, but not solely used substances; animal, human, and mineral products are also utilized. Thus, the term (medicinal) (instead of herb) is usually preferred as a translation for 药. 

There are over three hundred herbs that are commonly being used today. The most commonly used herbs are Ginseng (人参), wolfberry (枸杞子), Dong Quai (Angelica sinensis, 当归), astragalus (黄耆), atractylodes (白术), bupleurum (柴胡), cinnamon (cinnamon twigs (桂枝) and cinnamon bark (肉桂), coptis (黄莲), ginger (姜), hoelen (茯苓), licorice (甘草), ephedra sinica (麻黄, 麻黃), peony (白芍), rehmannia (地黄), rhubarb (大黄), and salvia (丹参). These are just a few of the herbs.

 

medical-plantsMedical Plant

The medicinal plant entrees now number over 950 and the separate lists of plants have been joined together into a Tagalog list and an English list for those plants with English designations. English names are included in the Tagalog lists for plants that have not acquired local names.

 

 

herbs-spicesHerbs and Spices 

This is a list of culinary herbs and spices. Specifically these are food or drink additives of mostly botanical origin used in nutritionally insignificant quantities for flavoring or coloring.

This list does not contain salt, which is a mineral, nor is it for fictional plants such as aglaophotis, or recreational drugs such as tobacco.

This list is not for plants used primarily as herbal teas or tisanes, nor for plant products that are purely medicinal, such as valerian.

 

Herbal Medicine

Herbal medicine or ( herbalism ) is the study and use of medicinal properties of plants. The scope of herbal medicine is sometimes extended to include fungal and bee products, as well as minerals, shells and certain animal parts. Pharmacognosy is the study of all medicines that are derived from natural sources.

The bark of willow trees contains large amounts of salicylic acid, which is the active metabolite of aspirin. Willow bark has been used for millennia as an effective pain reliever and fever reducer. 

Plants have the ability to synthesize a wide variety of chemical compounds that are used to perform important biological functions, and to defend against attack from predators such as insects, fungi and herbivorous mammals. Many of these phytochemicals have beneficial effects on long-term health when consumed by humans, and can be used to effectively treat human diseases.

At least 12,000 such compounds have been isolated so far; a number estimated to be less than 10% of the total.Chemical compounds in plants mediate their effects on the human body through processes identical to those already well understood for the chemical compounds in conventional drugs; thus herbal medicines do not differ greatly from conventional drugs in terms of how they work. This enables herbal medicines to be as effective as conventional medicines, but also gives them the same potential to cause harmful side effects.

The use of plants as medicines predates written human history. Ethnobotany (the study of traditional human uses of plants) is recognized as an effective way to discover future medicines. In 2001, researchers identified 122 compounds used in modern medicine which were derived from (ethnomedical) plant sources; 80% of these have had an ethnomedical use identical or related to the current use of the active elements of the plant. Many of the pharmaceuticals currently available to physicians have a long history of use as herbal remedies, including aspirin, digitalis, quinine, and opium.

The use of herbs to treat disease is almost universal among non-industrialized societies, and is often more affordable than purchasing expensive modern pharmaceuticals. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 80 percent of the population of some Asian and African countries presently use herbal medicine for some aspect of primary health care. Studies in the United States and Europe have shown that their use is less common in clinical settings, but has become increasingly more in recent years as scientific evidence about the effectiveness of herbal medicine has become more widely available.

Herbal Safety

A number of herbs are thought to be likely to cause adverse effects. Furthermore, adulteration, inappropriate formulation, or lack of understanding of plant and drug interactions have led to adverse reactions that are sometimes life threatening or lethal. Proper double-blind clinical trials are needed to determine the safety and efficacy of each plant before they can be recommended for medical use.

Although many consumers believe that herbal medicines are safe because they are natural;, herbal medicines and synthetic drugs may interact, causing toxicity to the patient. Herbal remedies can also be dangerously contaminated, and herbal medicines without established efficacy, may unknowingly be used to replace medicines that do have corroborated efficacy.

Standardization of purity and dosage is not mandated in the United States, but even products made to the same specification may differ as a result of biochemical variations within a species of plant.  

Plants have chemical defense mechanisms against predators that can have adverse or lethal effects on humans.

Examples of highly toxic herbs include poison hemlock and nightshade. They are not marketed to the public as herbs, because the risks are well known, partly due to a long and colorful history in Europe, associated with sorcery, magic and intrigue. Although not frequent, adverse reactions have been reported for herbs in widespread use.

On occasion serious untoward outcomes have been linked to herb consumption. A case of major potassium depletion has been attributed to chronic licorice ingestion., and consequently professional herbalists avoid the use of licorice where they recognise that this may be a risk. Black cohosh has been implicated in a case of liver failure.

Few studies are available on the safety of herbs for pregnant women, and one study found that use of complementary and alternative medicines are associated with a 30% lower ongoing pregnancy and live birth rate during fertility treatment. 

Examples of herbal treatments with likely cause-effect relationships with adverse events include aconite, which is often a legally restricted herb, ayurvedic remedies, broom, chaparral, Chinese herb mixtures, comfrey, herbs containing certain flavonoids, germander, guar gum, liquorice root, and pennyroyal.

Examples of herbs where a high degree of confidence of a risk long term adverse effects can be asserted include ginseng, which is unpopular among herbalists for this reason, the endangered herb goldenseal, milk thistle, senna, against which herbalists generally advise and rarely use, aloe vera juice, buckthorn bark and berry, cascara sagrada bark, saw palmetto, valerian, kava, which is banned in the European Union, St. John's wort, Khat, Betel nut, the restricted herb Ephedra, and Guarana.

There is also concern with respect to the numerous well-established interactions of herbs and drugs.In consultation with a physician, usage of herbal remedies should be clarified, as some herbal remedies have the potential to cause adverse drug interactions when used in combination with various prescription and over-the-counter pharmaceuticals, just as a patient should inform a herbalist of their consumption of orthodox prescription and other medication.

For example, dangerously low blood pressure may result from the combination of an herbal remedy that lowers blood pressure together with prescription medicine that has the same effect. Some herbs may amplify the effects of anticoagulants. Certain herbs as well as common fruit interfere with cytochrome P450, an enzyme critical to much drug metabolism.

 

 

 

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About Herbal Medicine

Herbal Preparations

List Of Chinese Herbal

List Of Medical Herbal

List Of Herbs And Spices

List Of Herbal Tea or Tisanes

List of Herbs For Culinary

Categories On Herbal Shop

Dry Herbal - Flowers

Dry Herbal - Fruits

Dry Herbal - Leaves

Dry Herbal - Mushroom

Dry Herbal - Others

Dry Herbal - Roots

Dry Herbal - Seeds

Dry Herbal - Sugar

 

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